Why Paphos

Why Paphos

Paphos is the jewel of Cyprus which has mild weather and unparalleled natural beauty with crystal clear Mediterranean waters framed by mountains sloping into the tranquil bays. As the capital of Cyprus for 600 years in antiquity, the archaeological legacy of Paphos is such that UNESCO put the whole city on its World Cultural Heritage list. Paphos has a diverse culture with a picturesque medieval harbor, mosaics, ancient tombs, churches and other antiquities. In September each year you can enjoy classical opera under the stars in the romantic setting of the castle which overlooks the harbour.

Paphos International Airport has been renovated and expanded in 2012 and has 80 new flights per week serving 14 new destinations. Tourist and leisure infrastructure includes numerous golf courses, plans for a luxury yacht marina and casino. There is also a new shopping mall being built which will house the second multiple screen cinema, more International high street stores, cafes and restaurants and other services. For the children there is a waterpark, a go-kart racing circuit, a paintball club, and other sporting clubs. For the teenagers and adults there are nightclubs on the Agios Antoniou street (locally known as Bar Street due to the bars and clubs). There are also some local taverns and nightspots that have locally performing artists playing the traditional music style, called Rembetika, using the instrument called a Bouzouki. Paphos offers culinary excellence at exceptional value with traditional taverns serving local cuisine as well as International eclectic restaurants. A wide selection of accommodation is offered in the city, ranging from luxury beachside hotels with every amenity, such as health spas, conference centres, fresh and salt-water pools and exotic gardens, to a variety of hotel apartments for the budget-conscious.

Paphos is split into two parts which are called Pano Paphos and Kato Paphos, (meaning Upper and Lower Paphos). Pano Paphos is built on a hill and is also locally known as Ktima. Pano Paphos has a number of modern shops on the hill, with a mix of high street and international designer labels. At the top of the hill you reach a local market each morning, selling local fruit, vegetables and nuts and other Cypriot products like leather and Lefkara lace, both for tourists and locals. There are also local shops selling Cyprus products and many lovely local restaurants and cafes to stop for a drink and a bite to eat when you need a rest from the shopping, whilst enjoying the panoramic views down to Kato Paphos and the Mediterranean sea. In Kato Paphos you will find the fort of Nea Paphos at the western end of the harbour. Kato Paphos is on the coast where there are many beaches to swim at, enjoying the warm waters. The road from the harbour had been recently renovated and partly pedestrianised, which continues along the edge of the sea one way to small tourist shops, cafes and restaurants and other tourist services. In the other direction from the harbour you can visit the Paphos Mosaics which are on the Aphrodite Cultural Route. Tombs of the Kings road runs along the western coastline towards Coral Bay and other small coastal villages such as Chloraka, Kissonerga and Peyia. If you travel inland towards the northern coastline you meet Peyia, Tala and Konia. These are very pretty Cypriot villages with tiny winding roads and local stone-built houses and are popular for residents of Cyprus and foreigners who wish to be further away from the cosmopolitan town centre.